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Curriculum

English

Students will be provided the fundamentals of communication skills for academic and career purposes. It will provide extensive practice in reading comprehension, writing and editing to prepare for HSPE. Students will focus on the conventions of essay writing, as well as essentials of effective sentence structure and organization. Through the study of the six-trait writing model, students will study and compose various genres of writing, including multi-paragraph expository and narrative essays.

Each course is .5 English Credit

Reading for PleasureCourse #1363, #1364

Through the study of novels, short stories, historical fiction, essays, letters, films and a series of video documentaries, students will be immersed in many different styles of fiction. Students will analyze and evaluate multiple racial and gender perspectives. Students will read a variety of texts, write expository essays using process and compare/contrast patterns of development, write summaries of literature, present oral critiques, and panel discussions, and use other means deemed appropriate by the instructor to convey understanding.

Each course number is .5 English Credit

English 7-8Course #1251, #1252

These courses will reflect the culmination of skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and research. The language skills will focus on mastery of standard usage issues and experimentation with style. The writing strand will integrate with speaking and listening and research strands to produce a multi-media presentation relating to construction that will serve as a capstone for the course. Students will read, analyze, and critique a variety of texts both fiction and non-fiction. Literature and non-fiction will focus primarily on British and world authors. The course will be taught using a variety of teaching techniques from direct instruction to small group work.

Each course number is .5 English Credit

American Studies satisfies English 5-6 and US Government credit requirements. The English portion of the course is one-half of a two period (2 credit) cross-curricular course. Since a major part of the class depends upon group and class discussions, oral presentations, and hands-on activities, a high level of maturity, motivation, and willingness to participate is expected and required. Students will be required to read a variety of literary forms: supplemental novels, short stories, poetry, and narrative pieces as well as reading from the class textbook. Several different styles of writing will also be explored: analytical, descriptive, narrative, persuasive, and expository.

Each course number is .5 English Credit

English 5-6Course #1231, #1232

These courses will strengthen and expand skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and research. The focus will be on increasingly sophisticated language skills such as complex sentence structures and word choice as it relates to the construction industry. Writing and reading assignments will incorporate higher level thinking skills such as synthesis and analysis. Literature and non-fiction will focus primarily on American authors. There will be a research component in the course. The course will be taught using a variety of teaching techniques from direct instruction to small group work.

Each course number is .5 English Credit

English 3-4 HonorsCourse #1213, #1214

These courses are designed for the highly motivated sophomore English student and focuses on skills and strategies in reading, writing, listening, speaking, research, vocabulary and usage. Students will study short story, memoir, non-fiction selections, novel, drama and poetry. Student writing will be varied, including expository, persuasive, literary analysis, creative writing, poetry, and research. In addition to continued study of Greek and Latin Roots, students will focus on prefixes and suffixes as tools to define words in context. Included in this course will be weekly SAT vocabulary study and standardized test preparation. The course will include a concentrated study of communication and public speaking skills. The homework expectation will be extensive.

English 3-4Course #1211, #1212

These courses will continue to develop skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, and research. It will continue to focus on language skills while expanding composition skills to include a variety of writing modes and audiences. Using the reading process, students will read and comprehend increasingly difficult texts, both fiction and non-fiction. There will be a research component in the course. The course will be taught using a variety of teaching techniques from direct instruction to small group work.

Each course number is .5 English Credit

English 1-2 HonorsCourse #1203, #1204

These courses are designed for the highly motivated freshman student and have strong compositional and critical thinking demands. The class stresses the writing process: writing for different purposes and audiences; grammar and sentence structure as tools for individual writing skills development; language usage; literary terms and genres; library research; vocabulary improvement; Greek and Latin Roots; encouragement of creativity; and the development of critical thinking. Students are expected to demonstrate an above average maturity level, demonstrate a positive attitude toward education and work tasks, and be cooperative in group learning situations. Homework will be extensive.

English 1-2Course #1201, #1202

These courses will provide the fundamentals of communication skills – reading, writing, speaking and listening, and research – necessary for school, academic and career purposes. The course will address language skills such as usage and sentence design. Students will write paragraphs, multi-paragraphs essays, and business communications, focusing on the six-trait model. Reading comprehension skills and reading strategies will be refined through readings in literature and non-fiction. Students will understand literary terminology and apply it to a variety of texts. There will be a research component in the course. The course will be taught using a variety of teaching techniques from direct instruction to small group work.

Each course number is .5 English Credit

Math

This one-year arithmetic-based course is designed to strengthen essential skills in fractions, ratios, proportions, and word problems for future math success. Math topics covered will include arithmetic calculation, measurement, basic geometry, coordinate system, formulas, algebra, foundational concepts, vocabulary and mental math. It will include a review of basic computational skills and concepts. In addition, students will develop the ability to reason and communicate mathematically, solve problems, and develop increased confidence in their mathematics ability.

Each Course Number is .5 Mathematics Credit

Pre Algebra 1-2Course #2103, #2104

This one-year course is designed to teach the basics needed to be successful in algebra. This course builds upon the essential skills of arithmetic as they apply to algebra. Real numbers, linear equations, linear inequalities, factoring, fractions, graphing and some elements of geometry are stressed. Students will use integers, decimals, rational numbers, exponents, and expressions to solve problems. Additional topics from geometry, basic trigonometry, discrete mathematics and examples from the construction industry will be covered.

Each Course Number is .5 Mathematics Credit

Algebra 1 Quarters 1 & 2Course #2201, #2202

This is one-year course is designed to teach the fundamentals of elementary algebra. This course lays the foundation of knowledge and skills needed in subsequent college preparatory mathematics courses. The major topics of study are: real numbers and the properties of real numbers; field properties; linear equations and the inequalities including systems; graphing; representing real world relationships; polynomials; factoring; square roots; quadratic equations; elements of probability and statistics; and problem solving. Throughout the year students will be expected to develop the ability to reason and communicate mathematically, apply learned concepts to new problem-solving situations; and exhibit increased confidence in their ability to solve mathematical problems in a variety of settings.

REQUIREMENT: Scientific calculator

Each Course Number is .5 Mathematics Credit

Geometry 1-2Course #2211, #2212

This is a one-year course that will cover the following topics with an emphasis on student exploration activities: proofs, axioms, postulates and theorems; plane geometric figures; right triangles; constructions; congruence and similarity; proportions; perimeter, area and volume; circles; coordinate and transformational geometry; three-dimensional geometry; inductive reasoning; and probability applied to geometry. Development of deductive reasoning skills will be emphasized. Students will also review algebraic techniques, work on realistic problems, and use technology as much as possible. Throughout the year students will be expected to develop the ability to reason and communicate mathematically, apply learned concepts to new problem-solving situations, and exhibit increased confidence in their ability to solve mathematical problems in a variety of settings.

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra 1-2 
REQUIREMENT: Scientific calculator

Each Course Number is .5 Mathematics Credit

Algebra 2 Quarters 1 & 2Course #2221, #2222

This is a one-year course which strengthens and expands the techniques and concepts learned in elementary algebra. This course will strengthen the student’s problem solving and algebraic skills in preparation for advanced mathematics courses. The major topics of study are: equations and inequalities; relations and functions; systems of equations and inequalities; matrices; polynomials and polynomial functions; irrational and complex numbers; quadratic equations, relations and functions; rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions; sequences and series; and elements of probability and statistics. Throughout the year, students will be expected to continue to develop the ability to reason and communicate mathematically, apply learned concepts to new problem-solving situations, and exhibit increased confidence in their ability to solve mathematical problems in a variety of settings.

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Geometry 1-2
REQUIREMENT: Scientific calculator

Each Course Number is .5 Mathematics Credit

STEM Algebra 2 Quarter 1 & 2Course #2227, #2228

This is a one-year course, which strengthens and expands the techniques and concepts learned in first-year algebra. This rigorous course will strengthen the student’s problem solving and algebraic skills in preparation for advanced mathematics courses, and will introduce some trigonometric topics. The major topics of study are: function and relation families (quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, exponential, radical, and rational); systems of equations and inequalities; irrational and complex numbers; sequences and series; trigonometric foundational concepts, and elements of probability and statistics. Throughout the year, students will be expected to continue to develop the ability to reason and communicate mathematically, apply learned concepts to new problem-solving situations, and exhibit increased confidence in their ability to solve mathematical problems.

This is a one year course designed to build upon the concepts presented in Algebra 2. Students will apply Algebra 2 concepts in real-life contexts to strengthen and expand problem solving, numerical literacy and application skills in preparation for post-secondary choices including the world of work, college, technical training or the military. The course will consist of four modules: Math in Finance; Math in the Fine Arts; Math in Technology and Math in Public Health. Mathematics topics that will be imbedded into the four modules include: Functions (Linear, Quadratics, Exponentials, Logarithms, Rational, and Polynomial); Geometry and Measurement (including Conics); Probability and Data Analysis.

Probability & StatisticsCourse #2243, #2244

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to explore concrete concepts, probability statistics and discrete mathematics. The first semester is spent studying probability and statistics topics including probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and experimental design. Students will be provided with opportunities to collect and analyze data relevant to students and draw conclusions based on this analysis. The second semester will involve a study of discrete mathematics used in the study of calculators and computers. It will include such topics as logic, set theory, matrices, networks, fractals and game theory.
Throughout the course, emphasis will be given to providing students with numerous opportunities to model situations using hands-on materials, graphing calculators, and computers. Students may take either semester without the other.

This is a one-year course designed to teach the basic fundamentals of trigonometry and to teach a variety of additional pre-calculus concepts. The major topics of study are: exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric and circular functions; polar coordinates ad complex numbers; matrices and vectors; sequences and series; and elements of probability and statistics. Throughout the year, students will continue to develop the ability to reason and communicate mathematically, apply learned concepts to new problem-solving situations and exhibit increased confidence in their ability to solve mathematical problems in a variety of settings.

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra 3-4
REQUIREMENT: Graphing calculator

Each Course Number is .5 Mathematics Credit

Elective

Proficiency MathCourse #2027

This is an elective credit course designed to help prepare students who have not passed the Nevada State Math Proficiency Test. The course concentrates on the four areas tested: numbers and operations; algebraic concepts; geometry and measurement; probability and statistics, and data analysis; along with test taking strategies. Students will review all the Nevada State Mathematics Standards and take many sample tests to prepare them to pass the Nevada State Math Proficiency Test, which is a requirement for graduation with a standard diploma.
PREREQUISITE: Needing to pass the Nevada Math Proficiency Test

Course Number is .5 Elective Credit

Science

Environmental Science 1-2Course #3111, #3112

Students will investigate various environmental issues and the local, regional, and national levels. The course will cover ecosystems, the processes of natural selection, natural resource utilization, conservation, threats to our environment, alternative energy sources and green construction techniques. This course has an emphasis on environmental science as it relates to construction.

Each Course Number is .5 Science Credit

Biology 1-2Course #3141, #3142

Biology 1-2 is a course where students will develop an understanding of the fundamental concept of biological science: genetics, heredity, cell process, natural history, selection, evolution, biodiversity and biotechnology. This course is based on and guided by the state of Nevada science standards. Students who receive credit in Life Science 1-2 may not receive credit for Biology 1-2.

Each Course Number is .5 Science Credit

Physical Science 1-2Course #3101, #3102

Physical Science 1 addresses the physical science standards for physics and Physical Science 2 addresses the chemistry and Earth space science standards. The science process standards are embedded within each course. Students who have successfully completed Physical Science 1-2 may receive credit for taking Chemistry; however, students who have successfully completed Chemistry may not receive subsequent credit for Physical Science 1-2. This course emphasizes Physical Science as it relates to the construction industry.

Each Course Number is .5 Science Credit

Social Studies

American Government 1-2Course #4161, #4162

This course will provide an examination of the three major branches of government, the study of the democratic process and the role played by individual citizens in the American political system. Other topics discussed will be free enterprise and its relationship of the consumer and government to the business cycle.

Each Course Number is .5 Social Studies Credit

US History 1-2Course #4131, #4132

This course offers an overview of the social, cultural, economic and political developments of America from the colonial times up to present day. Topics covered in this class will include America’s participation in world affairs and specific major foreign events such as world wars, social movements, internal development of this country and the problems faced from formation to the present. There will be a review of the major personalities and events that have shaped our history.

Each Course Number is .5 Social Studies Credit

World History 1-2Course #4101, #4102

This course is designed to acquaint students with history of mankind through a study of the development of selected western and eastern civilizations from their beginnings to the formation of nations and their subsequent histories. This course will focus on the economy, social structure, government, religion, and arts of each civilization and nation studied. Upon completion of this course, students will have an increased understanding of our cultural heritage and will also be aware of important developments in other cultures.

Each Course Number is .5 Social Studies Credit

World Geography 1-2Course #4117, #4118

World Geography satisfies the World History credit requirements. Study topics will include ancient civilizations, major world religions, classical Greece and Rome, Medieval Europe, the Renaissance and Reformation, the development of nations, the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, WWI and WWII, the Cold War, and current events. Students will have an increased understanding of western cultural heritage and will also become aware of important historical and cultural achievements of the peoples of the world.

Each Course Number is .5 Social Studies Credit

Career & Technical Education

Renewable Energy Technology Year 2Course #10879, #10880, #10881, #10882

This course is a continuation of RET1 and provides intermediate renewable energy technology students with instruction in advanced techniques and processes. Areas of emphasis include electric motors, programmable logic controllers, instrumentation, basic electricity, solar energy, wind energy, and geothermal resources.

This course is a dual enrollment course with TMCC.

Renewable Energy Technology 1Course #10877, #10878, #10879, #10880

This course introduces students to the development of energy sources from wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal resources. Students will engage in the use and development of energy conversion systems such as solar conversion systems, bioconversion systems, and other renewable energy sources. Students will also explore environmental impacts and availability of renewable energy resources. This course will also have a strong industrial and construction safety component as required by industry.

This course is a dual enrollment course with TMCC.

Diesel Power Technology Year 3Course #10765, #10767, #10766, #10768

Advanced Diesel Power Technology is designed for the third year student and focuses on advanced electronics and troubleshooting skills, heavy-duty steering and suspension, heavy-duty drivetrains, off-road hydraulic systems, and preventive maintenance.

Students will perform advanced diagnosis on electrical systems, powertrain and body control systems using a variety of electronic testing equipment. Students will also be performing inspection and repair of steering and suspension systems, to include both spring and air bag suspensions. In heavy-duty drivetrains, the student will perform transmission, driveshaft and differential inspections and service that are typically seen in medium and heavy over-the-road trucking industries. In the hydraulics component of the course, students are introduced to fluid power and will be able to recognize the basic types of circuits, the types of components used, and the basic service requirements of hydraulic systems. The course concludes with preventative maintenance, which covers safety and maintenance of medium and heavy over-the-road trucks from bumper to bumper, with students being able to perform a DOT safety inspection. In the second part of this course, the students are also prepared to compete in the SkillsUSA State Championships, wherein they match their skills against other competitors in Diesel Equipment Technology, Power Equipment Technology and Automotive Technology.

This course is a dual enrollment course with TMCC.

Diesel Power Technology Year 2Course #10762, #10764, #10765, #10767

This course begins with a review of safety, then moves directly into industrial diesel engines and engine systems. The students will learn by disassembling engines manufactured by Caterpillar, Cummins, Detroit Diesel, Isuzu, etc., then reassembling the engines to factory specifications with the expectation that the engines will run when completed. Both traditional and modern diesel technology will be represented, mimicking what the students will see when in the workplace.

In the second part of this course, students are introduced to the basics of electricity and electrical diagnosis, to include the use of a digital multimeter and hand-held electronic service tools. All of the basics of starting systems, charging systems, and lighting systems will be covered, along with hands-on troubleshooting of those systems. The course concludes with an introduction to chassis and powertrain electronics.
This course is a dual enrollment course with TMCC.

In the second part of this course, the students are also prepared to compete in the SkillsUSA State Championships, wherein they match their skills against other competitors in Diesel Equipment Technology, Power Equipment Technology and Automotive Technology.

 

Diesel Power Technology Year 1Course #10759, #10760, #10761, #10763

This course is for students with limited background in automotive technology. It begins with an OSHA safety course designed for the automotive and heavy-equipment working environment. In the first semester, the students are introduced to basic engine construction and design, engine systems, precision measuring, and using online technical service media. The students will work hands-on with light-duty diesel and gasoline engines. In addition, this course touches upon the basics of nearly all automotive areas, to include: Powertrain, suspension and steering, brakes and preventive maintenance.

In the second part of this course, students are taken through a rigorous study of vehicle braking systems, which includes all aspects of service and repair. As a part of this, students are given an introduction to electronics diagnosis, which is an essential part of servicing sophisticated Antilock Brake Systems. In the second part of this course, the students are also prepared to compete in the SkillsUSA State Championships, wherein they match their skills against other competitors in Diesel Equipment Technology, Power Equipment Technology and Automotive Technology.

This course is a dual enrollment course with TMCC.

Advanced CADD Year 3Course #10883, #10869, #10884, #10870

This program further develops the computer aided drafting and design concepts used in mechanical, architectural, design and modeling. Students in this course will may develop house plans to be used in the Advanced Building Trades Program.

Each Course Number is .5 Humanities Credit

Computer Aided Drafting and Design Year 2Course #10805, #10867, #10806, #10868

This program uses the latest industry specific software in a lab setting for students to learn to develop and generate computer enhanced drawings and graphics. Students will use computer software for mechanical drafting, architectural drafting, design, and modeling.

Each Course Number is .5 Humanities Credit

Computer Aided Drafting and Design Year 1Course #10803, #10804, #10805, #10867

Drafting 1 is designed to introduce all students to the fundamentals of drafting. The areas of instruction include sketching, drafting equipment, lettering, geometric constructions, orthographic projections, dimensioning, sectioning, auxiliary view and pictorials. This course will emphasize instruction in mathematics and measurement, which will be used in completing drawings and other drafting assignments. Accepted employment practices and safety factors are established early and stressed throughout the duration of the course. Drafting career information is also provided. Drafting 2 is designed to expand on the fundamental drafting skills learned in Drafting I by providing students with an opportunity to learn the drafting competencies needed as a prerequisite to advanced drafting courses and a career in drafting. The areas of instruction include a review of basic drafting principles, threads and fasteners, working drawings, sheet metal layouts, cams and gears, electrical drafting, and structural/architectural drafting. The area of Computer Aided Drafting will also be addressed and students will have the opportunity to spend time using the computer to produce orthographic drawings.

Each Course Number is .5 Humanities Credit

Construction Technology Year 3Course #10755, #10749, #10756, #10750

This course continues building on CT Years 1 and 2 and provides advanced constructions students with knowledge and skills in advanced construction applications. Through hands-on projects students develop technical skills that are used throughout the construction industry. The appropriate use of technology and industry-standard equipment and theory is an integral part of this course. Students will take on special projects and act as project manager in that environment. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have acquired entry-level skills for employment and be prepared for postsecondary education.

Construction Technology Year 2Course #10754, #10748, #10455, #10749

This course continues building on CT Year 1 In addition to everything in CT Grade9 and CT Year 1 students will do material take offs from house plans, they will write up orders, they will supervise small groups of second year students, they will work independently and participate in Skills-USA VICA. These students may also be asked to publicly speak to industry. Any successful student is this course should be able to secure employment in the construction industry.

Each Course Number is .5 Humanities Credit

Construction Technology Year 1Course #10751, #10752, #10753, #10754, #10747, #10748

This course continues to build on safety, tool recognition and usage and job site etiquette in the second year student. Students will earn their OSHA 10 hour card. Students must work on the jobsite everyday, in small groups, individually or with the whole class, to construct a single family home. Safety includes everything from OSHA 10 in addition to roof harnesses, scaffolding, eye and ear protection and power tools used while off the ground. Emphasis is placed on maturity and the ability to work independently. Students will do all aspects of construction including surveying, concrete, rough carpentry, plumbing, HVAC, electrical, insulation, sheetrock, roofing, finish fixtures, painting and landscaping.

Each Course Number is .5 Humanities Credit

Construction Technology Grade 9Course #10751, #10752

This course is designed to build the basic blocks of safety, tool recognition and job site etiquette in the frosh student. Students focus on safe use of all tools (power and hand), uses of all tools, appropriate dress at the jobsite, measurement and career pathways. The course offers study in hand drafting, CADD, masonry, data wiring, sheet metal, blueprint reading, estimation and public relations. This course gives the younger student the basics needed to be successful in the Building Trades.

Each Course Number is .5 Humanities Credit

Miscellaneous

Freshmen SuccessCourse #7131

Freshman success is required for all 9th grade students. It is a credit bearing course designed to help transition all incoming freshman into the high school setting and to develop within each student the positive self-discipline, self-learning and self-advocacies which will transfer to their future educational environments. The class will help jump start a successful four years at ACE High School and prepare them for the world beyond high school. It will include strategies to enhance academic achievement, increase problem-solving abilities, learn how to establish a positive attitude toward self and others, cut down on attendance issues, learn about career possibilities, increase participation in co- and extra-curricular activities, enhance reading, writing and listening skills, math skills, instructional center, and build relationships with classmates, teachers and parents. Students will leave this class with excellent organizational, academic and personal skills to tackle the remainder of their high school career with the expertise and knowledge for success and credits required to become a sophomore.

Study SkillsCourse #7177

This course is will teach students better study and work habits. Emphasis will be on time management, homework strategies, and seeking out resources available to assist a student with managing their coursework. An emphasis is placed on tracking and completing assignments.

Course Number is .5 Elective Credit

Work ExperienceCourse #8369

This program allows students who are already employed to earn ½ elective credit for every 216 hours of work to a maximum of 2 credits. Students enroll for work experience by completing the agreement with their teacher. Pay stubs or other verification of hours must be submitted to verify all hours worked. Any change in employment must be immediately reported to the teacher.

Each Course Number is .5 Elective Credit

Personal FinanceCourse #9320

This course is designed to help students understand the financial world they will live in and be a productive employee. Students will learn to balance a checkbook, apply for credit, budget, live within one’s means, analyze different interest rates and terms and manage time and money. This course is designed to give students the ability to analyze their finances and understand where their paycheck and tax returns go.

Course Number is .5 Humanities Credit

Financial LiteracyCourse #10209

This course is designed to learn the basics of handling money and finances, including how to create positive outcomes involving credit, banking, loans, etc.. Students will learn the basics of financial education/literacy through knowledge, skills, and confidence needed to manage their finances.

Course number is .5 Humanities Credit

Computer LiteracyCourse #8350

This course includes a brief history of the development of computer technology. Students will learn of the development of the microprocessor and the internal working circuits of a basic personal computer. Topics to be covered are: keyboarding, word processing, spreadsheets, database, Web design, graphics design, multi-media, telecommunications, and the history of technology, ethics of technology, career opportunities, and computer programming. Instruction will include daily keyboarding, communication protocols and internet etiquette.

Course Number is .5 Computer Literacy Credit

Study HallCourse #8029

This course is to assist students with their course work in their other classes. It is a self paced class where students are working quietly and independently on their own. There will be no credit awarded for this class.

Career SkillsCourse #9080

This course is designed to help students find work, develop career goals and cope with life in the workplace. Students will learn skills such as resume writing and interviewing skills that will prepare them to find work. They will be introduced to entrepreneurship and topics such as marketing, finance and human resources.

Course Number is .5 Humanities Credit

Topics to be covered will include economics, business and property law, business ownership and finance in the global economy; marketing, production, financial management and human resources in the local economy. Students will be exposed to guest speakers and current materials to emphasize the necessity of an educated business workforce.

Course Number is .5 Humanities Credit

 

Community ServiceCourse #8221

This program allows students who to earn ½ elective credit for every 120 hours of volunteer service to the local community up to a maximum of 1 credit. Students enroll for community service by completing the agreement with their teacher and local service organization. Hour verification must be submitted to verify all hours worked. Any change in service provider must be immediately reported to the teacher.

Course Number is .5 Elective Credit

Often teachers ask for student assistance to score objective assignments, type, file, and perform other tasks of a non-confidential nature. Interested students may pre-register for Student Aide only if they have prior written permission from a teacher for whom they wish to work. Student Aide may be added to a student’s schedule after the school year begins as teachers’ needs for assistance are expressed.

Course Number is .25 Elective Credit

HealthCourse #5311

This course shall include instruction in the physical, mental, emotional and social aspects of one’s health. Topics to be covered include the study of physical fitness, nutrition, mental health, safety and first aid. Current information on risks of tobacco, alcohol and drugs is emphasized. Studies will include heredity and genetics.

Course Number is .5 Health Credit

Supervised Curriculum PECourse #5028, #5029

This course is designed for students who wish to complete their physical education by independently working outside of the school day. Students must complete the application describing the program, work to be completed and time frame for completion. Supervisors of the work must sign the application and include a phone number for verification of hours. Students must complete a minimum of 60 hours per ½ credit. Weekly reports are due to the teacher.

Each Course Number is .5 PE Credit

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